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Reweti Arapere: Rangimatua

Past Exhibition
11 Apr – 09 Aug 2015
Free

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: Mark Tantrum

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: Mark Tantrum

At the opening of Rangimatua, 11 April 2015. Photographer: Mark Tantrum

At the opening of Rangimatua, 11 April 2015. Photographer: Mark Tantrum

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Reweti Arapere, Rangimatua, 2015. Courtesy of the artist. Photographer: John Lake.

Blending customary whakairo (carving) and contemporary art, Reweti Arapere will build a giant pou representing a tiki out of cardboard for one of our galleries. Inspired by Māoritanga (Māori culture) and street art, Rangimatua (Sky Father), will be adorned with felt pens to depict the creation myth of the sons of Ranginui and Papatuanuku.

Arapere’s kaupapa (philosophy) as an artist considers how to keep Māori language and culture relevant for future generations, connecting people to their heritage and to each other. This new installation will draw links between myth and the founding of the Kīngitanga (Māori king) movement in the nineteenth century, translating lessons about whanau and working together into a contemporary context. By adapting these stories for a younger generation, Arapere shows how myth and history continue to shape an evolving Māori cultural identity.

Born in Tauranga and residing in Palmerston North, Arapere has Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Porou and Ngāti Tuwharetoa iwi affiliations. Having attended Kohanga reo, he was also a first generation Kura Kaupapa student, taught entirely in Te Reo Māori. In 2009 Arapere completed a Master of Māori Visual Arts at Massey University School of Māori Visual Arts, Palmerston North. In 2010 he undertook a residency at Queen Elizabeth College, awarded by the Ministry of Education’s artists in schools programme. He has also attended international indigenous artist gatherings, travelling to Hawaii in 2007 for Piko, Tahiti in 2010 for Putahi, and Mexico City in 2011 for El Barroco de Aotearoa. Arapere has exhibited at Bowen Gallery, City Gallery Wellington, Enjoy Gallery and Expressions Whirinaki.

The Dowse Podcast

Reweti joined us on The Dowse Podcast to talk about Rangimatua. Listen to the podcast here.

Listen to our podcast
featuring Reweti Arapere,
as he talks about his 
work and practice

Listen to our podcast
featuring Reweti Arapere,
as he talks about his
work and practice