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Now showing: Māori video artists at The Dowse Art Museum

Author: Alex Grace, Communications and Relationships Manager

Opening at The Dowse Art Museum on 30 March, Māori Moving Image: An Open Archive, invites audiences to immerse themselves in works by more than twenty Māori moving image artists and discover the depth and talent of this extraordinary community.

“Thirty years on from the emergence of kohanga reo and kura kaupapa, the diversity and strength of Māori is alive and growing,” said Bridget Reweti, co-curator of the show. “Excellence within te reo Māori and toi Māori, including toi rerehiko (a term developed by Rachael Rakena to describe Māori moving image art) is obvious in the high quality of artwork exhibited by Māori artists both nationally and internationally. This exhibition serves to focus on the moving image aspect of Māori art through developing an archive of important Māori moving image works for audiences to see, connect with and discuss.”

Rachael Rakena (Ngāi Tahu, Ngā Puhi), ... as an individual and not under the name of Ngāi Tahu, 2001. Single-channel SD video (9 mins 24 secs). Courtesy of the artist

Rachael Rakena (Ngāi Tahu, Ngā Puhi), ... as an individual and not under the name of Ngāi Tahu, 2001. Single-channel SD video (9 mins 24 secs). Courtesy of the artist

Visitors to the show will see works from the last 40 years including Professor Robert Jahnke’s (Ngāi Taharora, Te Whānau a Iritekura, Te Whānau a Rakairo o Ngāti Porou), Te Utu, 1980, a short animated film which tells the Māori genesis story, and Lisa Reihana’s (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine, Ngāi Tū), Native Portraits n.19897 (1997) a waharoa or gateway to a marae or pā, commissioned for and displayed at the opening of Te Papa Tongarewa in 1997. Ensuring there’s something for repeat visitors to discover, there will be a revolving schedule of works in two screening rooms showing more recent creations like Sarah Hudson’s Karakia (Ritual Chants), 2016, a part of Ōpōtiki: New Zealand's first drone-friendly town.

Sarah Hudson, Karakia (Ritual Chants), 2016, a part of Ōpōtiki: New Zealand's first drone-friendly town. Courtesy of the artist.

Sarah Hudson, Karakia (Ritual Chants), 2016, a part of Ōpōtiki: New Zealand's first drone-friendly town. Courtesy of the artist.

Bridget Reweti said, “In this exhibition I’m eager to welcome Māori into galleries – as artists, performers, academics and visitors. I’m keen to discuss how video works made by Māori artists engage with cinema, architecture and customary narratives. How do different artists engage with the art form? How do audiences see works from the past and today?”

Nathan Pohio, (Kāti Mamoe, Ngāi Tahu and Waitaha), Sleeper, 1999. Two-channel video, sound (3 mins). Courtesy of the artist

Nathan Pohio, (Kāti Mamoe, Ngāi Tahu and Waitaha), Sleeper, 1999. Two-channel video, sound (3 mins). Courtesy of the artist

Melanie Oliver, the other half of the curatorial team said, “Collaboration, respect and support are at the heart of this exhibition. Which is why, we’ve created an exhibition with a revolving set of artists, and an extensive public programme of talks, screenings, performances and discussions. We are excited to be a venue for the conversations sparked by these important artworks.”

Lisa Reihana (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine, Ngāi Tū), Native Portraits n.19897 (1997). Eleven-channel video waharoa. Courtesy of Te Papa Tongarewa

Lisa Reihana (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Hine, Ngāi Tū), Native Portraits n.19897 (1997). Eleven-channel video waharoa. Courtesy of Te Papa Tongarewa

Māori Moving Image: An Open Archive, will feature work by Ana Iti, Eugene Hansen, Jamie Berry / Leala Faleseuga / Pikihuia Haenga, Janet Lilo, Jasmine Te Hira, Jeremy Leatinu'u, Layne Waerea, Leilani Kake, Lisa Reihana, Natalie Robertson, Nathan Pohio, Ngahina Hohaia, Nova Paul, Rachael Rakena, Rangituhia Hollis, Robert Jahnke, Sarah Hudson and Terri Te Tau.

Māori Moving Image: An Open Archive
30 Mar – 21 Jul 2019
The Dowse Art Museum, 45 Laings Road, Lower Hutt City Council
FREE entry

For more information: Alex Grace, Communications Manager, 022 6242152 alex.grace@huttcity.govt.nz

Robert Jahnke (Ngāi Taharora, Te Whānau a Iritekura, Te Whānau a Rakairoa o Ngāti Porou), Te Utu. The Battle of the Gods, 1980. 16mm animation. Courtesy of the artist, with thanks to Nga Taonga

Robert Jahnke (Ngāi Taharora, Te Whānau a Iritekura, Te Whānau a Rakairoa o Ngāti Porou), Te Utu. The Battle of the Gods, 1980. 16mm animation. Courtesy of the artist, with thanks to Nga Taonga

All images available for download here

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